Lesson Plan – Drama Games on TV

Whose line

 

Television: this magical light box that has so many times kept me company during those lonely only-child afternoons. We have been buddies for a long time now.

Numerous hours have I spent zapping channels in search of something fun and entertaining to watch.

And it was during those adolescent times that I discovered that those games I used to play at theatre class also existed in the magic box!

Shows like ‘Whose line is it anyway’ were part of my weekly schedule, never ever missing an episode.

Little did I know that not long after, all those goofy games would become part of my very own weaponry in the classroom.

Nowadays drama games are largely used on TV shows for pure entertainment. However, they come directly from very serious theatrical techniques and can surely be applied for educational purposes as well.

Below are some examples of classic and more recent shows displaying very famous drama games. I tried to adapt them into content-oriented lesson plans that can be applied in language learning.

I hope you can be inspired to adapt more games you see on your day-to-day lives for ELT.

As usual, enjoy it and have fun with the games!

 


 

Drama Game: Word Sneak – Vocabulary practice

 

 

Type:  Vocabulary Practice

Age: from teens up

Language level: all

Aim: Controlled practice of specific vocabulary

Interaction Pattern: pair work

Material: Sentences / words written on paper slips

Timing: 5-7 min


Procedure:

Tell your students that they will play a game to practice what they have just learned.

 

Tip:

Since the main goal here is for this game to be played as controlled practice, it would be a good idea to propose it right after vocabulary analysis.

 

Rearrange students in pairs and give each pair a stack of slips of paper with the language you want them to practice.

 

Tip:

Some ideas are:

Linkers (First, Then, Consequently, As a result, Nevertheless, ect…)

Expressions for agreeing and disagreeing (I see eye to eye with you, I see it differently, etc…)

Expressions for giving opinion (I think, I believe, I suppose, To my mind, etc…)

Vocabulary elevation (wealthy instead of rich, etc…) Words taken from a specifically difficult text students have just read

 

Tell students these words/sentences have to be used secretly in the middle of the conversation they will have with their partner.

As soon as they use one word/sentence, they have to discard the paper and get another one from the stack. The student that uses the last paper ‘wins’.

Write on the board a topic for the whole class to start their conversation.

 

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Don’t forget to link this topic to the activities done before in class and also to the language you want them to practice.

 

Tip:

Remember that on the show, Jimmy Fallon is a comedian and his objective is to be as absurd as possible.

Your objective is different: it’s to get students using those words in semi-spontaneous spoken discourse. The game may result in laughs in the classroom, but that’s not the goal. Depending on the topic and the language you provide your students, the outcome can be very serious meaningful exchange of ideas.

 

Walk around the class as take notes as students perform the activity. Provide help if necessary, but in general let them do most of the talking.

Since this is controlled practice, take a few minutes in the end to promote correction with the whole class based on your notes in order to move on to your next activity more smoothly.


 

Drama Game: Heads up – Relative Clauses

 

 

Type:  Grammar Practice

Age: all

Language level: all

Aim: Controlled practice of relative clauses

Interaction Pattern: pair work or group work

Material: Flashcards with faces and names of famous people

Timing: 5-7 min


Procedure:

Tell your students that they will play a game to practice what they have just learned.

 

Tip:

Since the main goal here is for this game to be played as controlled practice, it would be a good idea to propose it right after grammar analysis.

 

Rearrange students in pairs or in 2 large groups and hand them over some flashcards with names and faces of famous people.

Place all flashcards face down so no one sees who are on them.

 

Tip:

If you choose pairwork, students will have more chance to practice individually, but it’s harder for you to monitor their production.If you choose 2 large groups against each other, students will have less individual talking time, however you can supervise more thoroughly.

Choose either one or the other depending on what is better for them at that moment: a bit freer practice (if they have already gotten the hang of relative clauses) or more controlled practice (if they are still struggling with using the structure properly).

 

Tell students one member of each group will have to get a flashcard without looking and placing it over their head.

Heads Up

 

Then, their partner/people from the other group should describe who that person is using relative clauses. (e.g. This is someone who….. He was in a movie which…. He came from a place where…. etc.)

 

 

Tip:

If you feel your students are not yet ready to produce such complex sentences by themselves, you can provide them with some models on the board.

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Walk around the class as take notes as students perform the activity. Provide help if necessary, but in general let them do most of the talking.

 

Since this is controlled practice, take a few minutes in the end to promote correction with the whole class based on your notes in order to move on to your next activity more smoothly.


Drama Game: Scenes from a hat – Functions practice

 

 

Type:  Functions Practice

Age: all

Language level: all

Aim: Freer practice of specific functions

Interaction Pattern: group work

Material: Slips of paper with situations

Timing: 5-7 min


Procedure:

Tell your students that they will play a game to practice the topic they have just learned.

 

Tip:

Since the main goal here is for this game to be played as freer practice, it would be a good idea to propose it at the very end of the class. This is a good way to wrap up all the content of the class in one single activity.

 

Rearrange students in 2 large groups to compete against each other and have them stand up.

Tell them you have a few cards with situations on them. All the situations have to do with what they learned and they are expected to use the language seen this class.

Groups take turns acting out the situations given. Students can decide spontaneously if they will act that situation by themselves or with in unison.

Present a situation in which the function you want them to practice is needed and ask students to respond to it.

Each group has the chance to act the situation once.

After each group has presented their scene using the functions, you ask collectively which scene they think used better language.

Repeat the procedure as many times as you have cards and time to do so.

Help students notice that they were able to use the language learned in a ‘more real’ way.

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